Birds in February

February 12, 2020  This month, the weather was often cloudy and rainy, so I didn’t get out that much. I did go to Oshima Island last February 11 and, as is often the case, I was sidetracked in route by an interesting bird. In this case,a small flock of Black-faced Spoonbills feeding in an estuary near the road. I ended up missing the early ferry (caught the next one), but it was well worth it to observe and photograph this elegant, and endangered species.

    I recently came across an excellent documentary on the Black-faced Spoonbill. This species once numbered around 200 individuals, but due to the concerted efforts of people in the countries along the coasts of eastern Asia, their numbers have been increasing.   

  

  

    A few photos of the Black-faced Spoonbill and the “other” birds I happened to come across this February. 

Bull-headed Shrike, Pampas GrWhite-eye on plum blossomOriental Greenfinch, onion garden 2Darian Redstart, femaleBlack-faced spoonbill 3Black-faced spoonbill 2

Enjoy the spring, and thanks for visiting!

 

2 thoughts on “Birds in February”

  1. Aloha Tom,
    Is the first photo of a hawk?
    Beautiful photos, especially the two Spoonbills with bird on branch in foreground! What setting did you use to capture that moment? The second photo resembles a Mynah.

    Like

    1. Hey Bro, first photo is of a bull-headed shrike on pampas grass. Actually, the bird perched on a branch is a single photo separate from the two spoonbills. I should have created more space between them. The mynah-like bird is an oriental green finch.

      Like

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