Amanogawa, River of Heaven

July 7th, 2019     We are in the middle of the rainy season here in Japan. It can be cloudy and rainy everyday, sometimes for weeks. For an outdoor amateur photographer, it can be frustrating at times. So when last weekend had clear skies, I jumped in the car and headed to Hoshinomura, in the mood to photograph the Milky Way. Here, it is called Amanogawa, or River of Heaven. I set up my gear on the side of  a very small country road,  which looked out over a big valley with mountains in the distance. It was quite humid, and the dew point was quite high, (the temperature at which dew forms on surfaces colder than the air temperature). This means I had to apply heat pads (kairo) to the lens to prevent it from fogging up. I then sat in a camping chair and watched the heavens while the camera did it’s job. The following time lapse is the end result.

  I recently acquired a lens I had been wanting to get for a long time. I got it used through a local camera store. It is the Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM prime. A telephoto lens ideally suited to photographing birds, especially in flight. I only had one day of sunny weather, so I took the opportunity to try the lens out on the swift-moving Common Kingfisher. The photo  was taken using a tripod as the kingfisher was rising from the water about 30 meters from my position. I really like this lens, and am looking forward to becoming familiar with it. The other birds are the Siberian Meadow Bunting, (Houjiro), and the Narcissus Flycatcher, (Kibitaki).

Thank you for visiting!

 

2 thoughts on “Amanogawa, River of Heaven”

  1. Whenever I see the Milky Way, it gives me chills, because it’s a direct visual reminder of the immensity of our galaxy. This realization is soon followed by the knowledge of the massive number of other galaxies which are out there. And then I feel overwhelmed with the perplexing question(s), How could there be an end”…..”How could there not be an end!!” From this point on I can only be philosophical about the Universe. Not knowing is both a blessing and a personal conundrum.

    Like

  2. Carl Sagan’s comment, “We are a way for the Cosmos to know itself.”
    is an interesting perspective. It is a wonderful gift to feel those chills.
    To ponder the Cosmos is truly humbling and wondrous, and possibly a gateway to our souls. Possibilianism; It suits me!

    Like

Leave a Reply to Rick Bunner Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.